CAFTA-DR Agrifood Market Integration Consortium
 

Introduction | 2007 Workshop | NAAMIC Website
CAMIC Logo
CAMIC Workshop I: Transition to CAFTA-DR

In designing this program, the Planning Committee recognized that a key to the success of CAFTA-DR involves the participating countries transitioning to harmonized or compatible agrifood and rural development policies that most effectively utilize the human and natural resources of the region. The Committee recognizes that this will require substantial adjustment beyond what has begun under the customs union policies and globalization forces that have initiated the market integration process. It will require a more regional and less nationalistic approach to enhancing competitiveness and solving problems. The program is designed to draw conclusions regarding the key components of this regional approach and how the transition can be accomplished with the greatest benefit to all the people of the region.

acrobat These papers are in PDF format. Click here to download the FREE Adobe Acrobat Reader 8.0.

Final Report - English Only

Executive Summary - English

Executive Summary - Spanish

Session I – Market Integration in CAFTA-DR

If CAFTA-DR is to achieve its objective of maximizing the benefits of increased trade and economic development, the markets and policies of its member countries must become integrated. This base paper will begin by defining the concept and dimensions of market integration, but will devote the major share of the content to analyzing the regions current agrifood trade flows and the extent of market integration under CAFTA-DR. It will identify the extent to which the region’s customs union has fostered integration and specific needs to jumpstart further regional economic activity. In so doing, it will discuss the need to overcome nationalistic attitudes and customs that lead to barriers to market integration in favor of regional approaches to agricultural economic development. It will end by explicitly identifying the principal challenges to achieving future market integration.

Chair: Luis Rodríguez – DR

Market Integration in CAFTA-DR Steven Zahniser, US - USDA
Paper
Presentation: (web) (Adobe Acrobat)
Noe Hernandez, SV - Ag. Ministry
Paper
Presentation: (web) (Adobe Acrobat)
Megan Romberg, US - USDA
Paper
Presentation: (web) (Adobe Acrobat)

Reaction Panel --

Mauro Suazo-HN, HN - Melon Assoc.
Paper
Presentation: (web) (Adobe Acrobat)
Lucho Florencio, DR - Rice Grower Assoc.
Paper
Presentation: (web) (Adobe Acrobat)

Francisco Menendez, GT - Agexport
Paper
Presentation: (web) (Adobe Acrobat)

Session II – Lessons Learned From Other Blocs

Chair: J.B. Penn – US – John Deere

Lessons Learned From Other Blocs: The NAFTA Experience Rene Ochoa, MX - SAGARPA
Paper
Presentation: (web) (Adobe Acrobat)
Pablo Sherwell, MX - SAGARPA
Paper
Presentation: (web) (Adobe Acrobat)
Gloria Abraham - IICA
Paper
Presentation: (web) (Adobe Acrobat)

Discussants --

Jorge Tello, Andean - Peru
Paper
Presentation: (web) (Adobe Acrobat)
Daniela Alfaro, MERCOSUR - UR
Paper
Presentation: (web) (Adobe Acrobat)

Session III – Developing Successful Supply Chains in CAFTA-DR

It is becoming increasingly apparent that success in agriculture requires that farmers have access to supply chains that meet the desires of consumers for quality products throughout the year. The “managers” of these supply chains are major food retailers, food service operators, or processors that insist that the products they buy uniformly meet both international standards and their own production and quality specifications, which may exceed international standards. They also increasingly desire that production and handling be traceable from farm to plate. This requires vertically integrated or coordinated marketing, handling and processing systems. Satisfying the needs of these supply chains may require production from more than a single Central American country. This paper must not only explain that nature and requirements of developing supply chains, but also how they must operate internationally, extending to the CAFTA-DR countries. This includes addressing issues such as cross-border trading requirements (including SPS and technical requirements), the need for technological change, conversion of the producer culture to a business orientation, and strategies for clustering smaller producers to enter supply chains. Examples from operating supply chains are essential.

Chair: Raquel Artecona – US – ECLAC/CEPAL

Developing Successful Supply Chains in CAFTA-DR Mark Lundy, CGIAR
Paper
Presentation: (web) (Adobe Acrobat)
Tom Reardon, US - Michigan State
Paper
Presentation: (web) (Adobe Acrobat)
The Impact of Food Safety Standards on an Export-Oriented Supply Chain: Case of the Horticultural Sector in Guatemala Spencer Henson, CAN – U of Guelph
Paper
Presentation: (web) (Adobe Acrobat)
Jose Blandon, CAN – U of Guelph
Paper
Presentation: (web) (Adobe Acrobat)

Supply Chain Innovation Panel --

Jorge Cordero, US - Wal-Mart
Paper
Presentation: (web) (Adobe Acrobat)
Tulio García, GT - Cuatro Pinos
Paper
Presentation: (web) (Adobe Acrobat)
Ernesto Baron, Poultry & Egg Export Council – US
Paper
Presentation: (web) (Adobe Acrobat)

Beatriz Tubino, Peru – Case Study: Asparagus in Peru
Paper
Presentation: (web) (Adobe Acrobat)

Session IV – Transition Policies

Conversion from an economy based on production for local markets to one based on international trade and the principles of comparative advantages embodied in CAFTA-DR inevitably requires changes in production patterns. In addition to farmers changing what they produce, this conversion may require becoming familiar with new technologies, business practices, and marketing strategies, such as accessing supply chains. In the CAFTA-DR region, those enterprises identified as potentially being the most directly affected include rice, sorghum, yellow corn, beans, poultry, beef, dairy products, pork, onions, and potatoes. Even though CAFTA-DR provides longer adjustment periods for commodities deemed to be sensitive, it seems that neither governments nor farmers are properly prepared for this transition. Government policies designed to help farmers adjust to inevitably changing competitive conditions are the primary focus of this base paper. This paper should examine specific transition policies, including activities that cope with and facilitate the adjustment process and consider lessons learned from other free trade agreements. Emphasis should be placed on what countries are already doing, their plans for the future, and the challenges involved with getting governments and the private sector to work together.

Chair: Bernardo López – GT – Sec. of Ag.

Transition Policies Amy Angel, SV – FUSADES
Paper
Presentation: (web) (Adobe Acrobat)
Jesús de los Santos, DR – Consultant
Paper
Presentation: (web) (Adobe Acrobat)

Reaction Panel --

Mario Amador, NI - Sugar Assoc.
Paper
Presentation: (web) (Adobe Acrobat)
Bernardo Vargas, CR - Ornamentals
Ensayo
Presentation: (web) (Adobe Acrobat)

Ana Christina, GT – Ministry of Agriculture
Ensayo
Presentation: (web) (Adobe Acrobat)

Luncheon Address

Governments’ Role in Food Quality and Safety Certification

Lloyd Day, US –USDA/AMS
Paper
Presentation: (web) (Adobe Acrobat)

Session V – Dealing with Issues of Rural Development in the CAFTA-DR Countries

A substantial share of the rural population lives in a subsistence culture or nearly so. These often poverty conditions are a breeding ground for civil unrest and instability. For the adult population, particularly those families with a single parent and the elderly, safety net policies are at least as essential in rural areas as they are in the cities. For children and young adults, improved education is a key to moving out of poverty. For all population segments, infrastructure improvement and jobs need to be fostered. This base paper is designed to deal with the problems of the poor living in rural areas of the CAFTA-DR bloc. Policy areas to be addressed include rural infrastructure, education, social investment, job creation, and safety net programs. What constitutes a comprehensive strategy? Since resources are limited, sources of support/funding and priorities must be addressed. Are there any rural development, education and safety net models from the region?

Chair: James French – CR – IICA

Dealing with Issues of Rural Development in the CAFTA-DR Countries Hans Jansen, CR – IFRPI
Paper
Presentation: (web) (Adobe Acrobat)
Máximo Torero, CR – IFRPI
Paper
Presentation: (web) (Adobe Acrobat)
Mexico: Human Capital and Income. Education Returns, 1994-2005 Juan Luis Ordaz, MX – CEPAL
Paper
Presentation: (web) (Adobe Acrobat)

Reaction Panel --

Dennis Lesnick, SV – FINTRAC
Paper
Presentation: (web) (Adobe Acrobat)
Guillermo Alvarado, HN – Former MAG
Paper
Presentation: (web) (Adobe Acrobat)

Norberto Quezada, DR -- Consultant
Paper
Presentation: (web) (Adobe Acrobat)

Session VII – Concluding Remarks

The members of this panel helped to design the First Annual CAFTA-DR Workshop. Their charge is to (1) identify the points in the workshop that most impressed them, (2) to point the direction for policy and program changes within the region, (3) to evaluate the extent to which the workshop has achieved its objectives, and (4) to suggest topics that need to be explored in future workshops. Following the Planning Committee presentations, the delgates will be ask to make suggestions regarding (1) the direction for policy and program changes within the CAFTA-DR region and (2) to suggest topics that need to be explored in future workshops.

Chair: Luis Ribera

Panel --

Luis R. Rodríguez, DR
Paper
Presentation: (web) (Adobe Acrobat)
Amy Angel, SV
Paper
Presentation: (web) (Adobe Acrobat)
Medardo Galindo, HN
Paper
Presentation: (web) (Adobe Acrobat)
Sergio Navas, CR
Paper
Presentation: (web) (Adobe Acrobat)
Tulio Garcia, GT
Paper
Presentation: (web) (Adobe Acrobat)
Jorge Brenes, NI
Paper
Presentation: (web) (Adobe Acrobat)
Robert Hoff, US
Paper
Presentation: (web) (Adobe Acrobat)